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From KNOW THYSELF: Adventures in Getting to Know My Own Mind by Steve Perrin. Available at Lulu.com.

60. Effective action in a world we can never know for sure, that is what our individual minds are given us to accomplish—if we can learn enough about our inner selves in time to make that happen. (Introduction, p. xxxi.)

61. In the first chapter, A Mind at Work, I present the stories of eighteen incidents in which the workings of my personal consciousness stand revealed. My hope is that these examples will remind you of incidents when your own mind played similar tricks and you were able to catch your mental apparatus in stop motion during the act of leading you astray. The rest of this book develops themes arising from  my grappling to make sense of these and other everyday incidents. (Introduction, p.

xxxi.)

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Copyright © 2011 by Steve Perrin

From KNOW THYSELF: Adventures in Getting to Know My Own Mind by Steve Perrin. Available at Lulu.com.

58. Each of us regards every sensory phenomenon from the standpoint of whether it is in our best interest or not, so our job comes down to acting in such a way to play up our interests and play down our faults in order to be ourselves to the max without harming others, while encouraging everyone else to do the same as a complement to ourselves. (Introduction, p. xxxi.)

59. When circumstances are against us, we have only our biological values to fall back on. No shirking, no shortcuts. Just working away doing the best job we can with our unique mix of skills and stamina, foibles and finesse—for that is the job we are born to and die away from. (Introduction, p. xxxi.)

Copyright © 2011 by Steve Perrin

From KNOW THYSELF: Adventures in Getting to Know My Own Mind by Steve Perrin. Available on Lulu.com.

55. Making sense of the world takes work because the phenomena we attend to are frequently small, unclear, or ambiguous. This is particularly true if we are tired, distracted, in a hurry,or not paying attention. (Introduction, p. xxx.)

56. The quality of our attention gets shoddier every year as the outer clamor makes ever greater claim to whatever serenity is left in our heads. (Introduction, p. xxx.)

57. If we defer to those who would grab our attention, there is nothing left for us to spend on leading our own lives by simply being ourselves. (Introduction, p. xxxi.)

 

Copyright © 2011 by Steve Perrin

From KNOW THYSELF: Adventures in Getting to Know My Own Mind by Steve Perrin. Available on Lulu.com.

51. Each of us is a unique specimen of humanity, not a replica of anyone else, nor a model for others. (Introduction, p. xxix.)

52. If we humans are to know ourselves, which is clearly a prerequisite to knowing anyone or anything else, then we must start by looking into ourselves to better understand why we have the wonderfully strange ideas that we do, and follow through on those ideas in making ourselves happen in the world—as we cannot deny that we do every day of our lives. (Introduction, p. xxix.)

53. Introspection has received a bad press as somehow introverted or even narcissistic, but how else are we to learn about our unique selves if not by becoming familiar with the workings of our own minds? (Introduction, p. xxx.)

54. This book is not about mental illness or therapy. It is about the workings of the everyday mind, and of one mind in particular, namely mine, the only one I have access to and concerning which I can claim to be the world’s leading expert. (Introduction, p. xxx.)

 

Copyright © 2011 by Steve Perrin

From KNOW THYSELF: Adventures in Getting to Know My Own Mind by Steve Perrin. Available on Lulu.com.

48. As I write these words, . . . the news is full of woe and dire predictions concerning the economy, our system of governance, endless wars, social neglect or hostility, over-consumption of natural resources, failure of our systems of healthcare and education, over-population, resulting in a relentless decimation of not only our different cultures but the Earth itself on which all people depend for support. (Introduction, p. xxix.)

49. I trace this ruination of the human world and its planet to intolerance aimed at those whose uniqueness we are not able to understand or appreciate because we don’t know ourselves very well, and as a result have no chance of understanding strangers who differ from us in leading outward and inward lives unique to themselves. (Introduction, p. xxix.)

50. Since I am a unique being, it makes no sense to generalize the qualities of my mental experience to my peers or my sex, much less to all of humanity. I am what I am,myself and no other. (Introduction, p. xxix.)

 

Copyright © 2011 by Steve Perrin

From KNOW THYSELF: Adventures in Getting to Know My Own Mind by Steve Perrin. Available on Lulu.com.

45. As a species, we seem to find it easier to take for granted that the world we know is the true one, and the one others inhabit is at best a distortion, or at worst a lie to the extent it differs from ours. This results in all sorts of pandemonium and hostility—which passes as the normal state of affairs in worlds based on conflicting realities. (Introduction, p. xxviii.)

46. The human tragedy flows not only from failing to honor the uniqueness of our individual perspectives but, too, from each perspective believing itself to be the only true one, all others being dismissed as hostile pretenders to the truth. (Introduction, p. xxviii.)

47. Arrogant absolutism is the original sin of our tribe, which all evidence shows is undoing our respective accomplishments through senseless conflict with one another. (Introduction, p. xxix.)